Fight Scenes Part 2: Physical Differences

Here is the second installment of my Fight Scene series based off notes from Jonathan Maberry’s fabulous class. If you haven’t already, check out Fight Scenes Part 1: An Introduction. So lets’ get started. This post will be dedicated to how physical differences in all parties involved can make a big difference in how a fight plays out.

Physical differences are a BIG deal…

  • Small against large
  • Speed
  • Longer reach
  • Muscle density matters
  • Length of hair matters
  • Abilities matters, better trained more chance of win
  • Location is big
  • Clothing
  • Tools

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Fight Scenes Part 1: An Introduction

I finally managed to get through my notes from Jonathan Maberrry’s (the author of the popular Rot and Ruin series) workshop at Context 27 and man did I have a lot. So much that it looks like I’ll have to break this down into a five part series (sorry). But I think it will work better that way because it will allow me to break it down into specific sections. I will start with this introduction, then part 2 on physical differences, part 3 on hand to hand combat, part 4 on weapons, and lastly part 5 on psychological warfare. Oh and make sure to look for the Fun Facts at the end of each post in this series!

So let’s get started as we look at some very basics of fight scenes and fighting information in general. The very first thing to remember with ALL fight scenes is…

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We All Deserve to Be Happy

I won’t go into great detail, but because of some health issues I’ve been having since May of this year, I decided to consult a holistic doctor a few weeks back. My medical avenues had been exhausted up to that point. The general consensus- we don’t know what’s wrong with you.

Well, after two and a half hours my consultant (Linda Potts from Healing Waters Wellness Center) seemed to know exactly what I needed to get back on the path of healing. Not only did she give me natural supplements to heal my body, but gave me advice to heal my emotional wounds. Since then my life has taken some drastic turns and all for the better.

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Context Again! A Writing Convention to Remember

Count it… one, two, there, four times I’ve been to the awesome horror, science fiction, and fantasy convention Context 27, and each time it just gets better and better. This year I only got in two workshops, but I did sit on four different panels. I also hung out with some awesome people I’ve met at the convention in the past and even made a few new friends. The best part of the whole weekend was the satisfied (and hungover feeling) as I went home Sunday, knowing I’d had fun with friends and learned a thing or two I didn’t already know about writing.

My favorite workshop was by Jonathan Maberry and it was called How to Write a Kick-Ass Fight Scene. I loved the workshop mostly because it was exactly what I needed. Why? Well, that happens to be one area in my writing I totally suck ass at. But with a little help from one of the greatest horror writers of today, I might actually kick-ass for once. At least I don’t feel quite so lost when I think of writing a fight scene, and feel pretty good at trying to use his guidelines. Can’t wait to try!

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The Broken Brain

How many times have you felt like you’ve had a broken brain? You know… like when your mind just refuses to work? When a word is just beyond reach? When an idea can’t seem to fully form. Or how about when forgetfulness rules the day? Some might call that a bad day or give it a technical term like a cognitive malfunction, but I call it broken brain.

I get broken brain a lot. Too much actually. I can go whole days where words and thoughts just aren’t coming out like they should. Hell, I’ve had whole weeks like that. It’s frustrating to know the word you want to use, but can’t quite get it from the brain to tongue, or brain to page.

So is there a cure? Can this malfunction be restored? Can the broken brain be repaired?

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Become an Emotional Writer

Recently, a friend of mine emailed a question about how to let the reader in on what another character other than the main character is feeling. I promptly answered, and then realized it would also make a great topic for a blog post. I haven’t touched on emotional writing for awhile, so here we go. Let’s dive into how to become an emotional writer.

Ever read or written a sentence like this…..

“You can’t be serious? How could you do that? Roger replied angrily.

OR

“Wow. Would you look at that?” Madison said. I could tell she was surprised.

On the surface there’s nothing really wrong with these sentences. But from a creative writing standpoint, well… they aren’t that spectacular either. Mostly, because these sentences are telling the reader what’s going on instead of showing it. The reader doesn’t want to be told how the characters are feeling, they want to feel it for themselves. One of the best way to accomplish this is to give emotional cues.

What’s an emotional cue?

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An Author Interview and a Journey to Another Galaxy

Let’s continue the journey across the great expanse of space to the Ethian Empire and the underground tavern where Markus Nador has turned the tables and is now questioning me after my attempt to interview my character in A Character Interview and a Journey to Another Galaxy

I sit back down at the table and look across to Markus expectantly. Gone is the attempt to hide in the shadows as he leans forward with a smug grin that makes me think that perhaps he’d planned this turn of the tables all along.

“Tell me, why did you come here?”

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