An Author Interview and a Journey to Another Galaxy

Let’s continue the journey across the great expanse of space to the Ethian Empire and the underground tavern where Markus Nador has turned the tables and is now questioning me after my attempt to interview my character in A Character Interview and a Journey to Another Galaxy

I sit back down at the table and look across to Markus expectantly. Gone is the attempt to hide in the shadows as he leans forward with a smug grin that makes me think that perhaps he’d planned this turn of the tables all along.

“Tell me, why did you come here?”

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How to Get Your Work Rejected

A catchy tile isn’t it? How to get your work rejected. It’s a great way to get a writer’s attention, and it certainly got mine as I checked the list of panels Context offered this year. I knew right away that if I didn’t attend any other panels (and I didn’t, ran out of time), this was the one I wanted to do. Sure I’ve had my fair share of rejection letters. What writer hasn’t? It’s the accepted gauntlet all writers must endure as a rite of passage. Mostly, I wanted to attend to see if science fiction writer Jack McDevitt had anything new to say that I hadn’t already gleaned from the stack of rejections letters I’ve managed to accumulate over the last few years. I’m happy to say, this panel didn’t disappoint. It gave a lot of useful information, which I am now passing on to you. Enjoy.

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Some Things to Keep in Mind When Self Editing

This blog post is based off a recent workshop I took at Context. The shop was presented by author Gary A. Braunbeck. I found his class  gave some really great advice, so I thought I’d pass it along for others who might find it useful too. The following is an accumulation of handouts, and notes I took. His advice covered everything from dialogue tags to punctuation. Enjoy.

  • First Rule of Editing. ALL editing should be left to second draft and beyond. A first draft should not be edited until it is completed.
  • Had. Avoid using the word “had” anywhere but in dialogue; when this happens, you will be telling the reader something instead, not showing. Consider the word to be a warning bell if you see it in the body of your narrative.
  • Character Names in Dialogue. Avoid having characters use each others name too much when in conversation; shift the focus by using a simple physical action.

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